SQUAWK TALK
By Valerie SeckerOne of life’s striking synchronicities struck this morning on Twitter and on television, crossing paths in the world of business news. After awakening to an Andrew Ross Sorkin Tweet about Microsoft’s new joint venture with Barnes & Noble [ http://bit.ly/Jwk7hE ], I turned on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” to see what else was cooking in the reported $300 million deal, which will spin off B&N’s Nook and college business units into a digital reading entity. Lo and behold, it happened that CNBC was hawking a new Squawk Book Club feature, which premiered today in the 8:00 a.m. EDT hour. Mere coincidence?First up in Squawk’s lively book talk circle of Becky Quick, Joe Kernan, and Sorkin was New York Times columnist and author James B. Stewart, there to talk about his 1991 Pulitzer Prize winner “Den of Thieves.” Asked by Sorkin what he’d change in Den, Stewart replied he’d make it shorter. “I don’t like long now,” Stewart said.Squawk Book Club cuts against the grain of the omnipresent, real time news and information barrage of the 2010s, revisiting business books with historic impact. This pause to reassess books with their authors, in the context of today’s news and events, is a refreshing one. It’s like a breather early in a new day. Reflection, anyone?Oddly, the book club, divided into three legs for its maiden voyage, waited until the second segment to entertain some big merger and acquisition news of the day — the birth of a digital reading venture that will be 18 percent-owned by Microsoft, with the balance held by bookseller Barnes & Noble. This was surprising given the nature of Squawk Book Club and CNBC.By 10:00 a.m. EDT, Barnes & Noble (BKS) stock had surged 64 percent to $22.41 from its previous close of $13.68 [ http://bloom.bg/IORnR9 ]. BKS opened trading Monday at $25.79 and ended the session at $20.75, up 52 percent.
Taking the long view in the 8:00 a.m. hour of Squawk Box, the division of Squawk Book Club into different parts brings some edge to the feature, suggesting there could be something timely coming up soon. Markets are moving, business is brewing, and who knows what tidbit there could be to chew on next.

SQUAWK TALK

By Valerie Secker

One of life’s striking synchronicities struck this morning on Twitter and on television, crossing paths in the world of business news.

After awakening to an Andrew Ross Sorkin Tweet about Microsoft’s new joint venture with Barnes & Noble [ http://bit.ly/Jwk7hE ], I turned on CNBC’s “Squawk Box” to see what else was cooking in the reported $300 million deal, which will spin off B&N’s Nook and college business units into a digital reading entity. Lo and behold, it happened that CNBC was hawking a new Squawk Book Club feature, which premiered today in the 8:00 a.m. EDT hour. Mere coincidence?

First up in Squawk’s lively book talk circle of Becky Quick, Joe Kernan, and Sorkin was New York Times columnist and author James B. Stewart, there to talk about his 1991 Pulitzer Prize winner “Den of Thieves.” Asked by Sorkin what he’d change in Den, Stewart replied he’d make it shorter. “I don’t like long now,” Stewart said.

Squawk Book Club cuts against the grain of the omnipresent, real time news and information barrage of the 2010s, revisiting business books with historic impact. This pause to reassess books with their authors, in the context of today’s news and events, is a refreshing one. It’s like a breather early in a new day. Reflection, anyone?

Oddly, the book club, divided into three legs for its maiden voyage, waited until the second segment to entertain some big merger and acquisition news of the day — the birth of a digital reading venture that will be 18 percent-owned by Microsoft, with the balance held by bookseller Barnes & Noble. This was surprising given the nature of Squawk Book Club and CNBC.

By 10:00 a.m. EDT, Barnes & Noble (BKS) stock had surged 64 percent to $22.41 from its previous close of $13.68 [ http://bloom.bg/IORnR9 ]. BKS opened trading Monday at $25.79 and ended the session at $20.75, up 52 percent.

Taking the long view in the 8:00 a.m. hour of Squawk Box, the division of Squawk Book Club into different parts brings some edge to the feature, suggesting there could be something timely coming up soon. Markets are moving, business is brewing, and who knows what tidbit there could be to chew on next.